wallsofsilence.com

Childhood trauma and its consequences
It is currently Thu Oct 17, 2019 7:47 pm

All times are UTC + 1 hour [ DST ]




Forum locked This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 4 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Dog Psychology
PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2006 12:35 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2006 9:33 pm
Posts: 14
Hello everyone,

Things have been pretty quiet at the site here; I hope everyone is having a nice summer.

I have been watching the "Dog Whisperer" first season set of DVDs starring Cesar Millan -- The Dog Whisperer. The set is available at amazon.com for $34.99 ? a great bargain in my opinion considering there?s over ten hours footage. I highly recommend this set of DVDs for anyone who has an interest in psychology.

What I am hoping is that I can learn something about human behaviour and human psychology from Cesar's vast knowledge of dog behaviour and dog psychology.

There are many examples on the DVDs of dogs that are aggressive ? dogs that attack other dogs, dogs that attack people, and sometimes even dogs that attack their own owners. In some of these cases, Cesar is contacted as a last resort before the dog is put down. There are also examples of dogs that exhibit obsessive behaviours (i.e. constantly chasing their own tail), dogs with separation anxiety, dogs with phobias, stubborn dogs, and a whole host of other problems.

I was truly amazed at this man's ability to deal with complex (and sometimes violent) behavior patterns and often turn things around in a matter of minutes. Actually, it is more the dog owner?s behaviour that needs to change than the dog?s. If handled properly, the dog is merely doing whatever it is that the leader asks of it. Unfortunately, most people do not realize the meaning or nature of the energy they are putting out and as such do realize what they are really asking their dog to do. Their words might be saying ?nice dog?, but their behaviour/energy is telling the dog to behave in aggressive/neurotic ways.

Here are a couple of examples of dog psychology cases from the DVDs:

1) There is a dog that acts violently to anything on wheels ? skateboards, bikes, etc. Cesar brings along his five-year old son on his bike to help rehabilitate the dog. Cesar seamlessly manages the dog with one hand and helps his wobbly son on his bike with the other hand.

2) In another case, Cesar enters the cage of an extremely aggressive dog and sits down with his back to the dog.

I won?t say too much more because I don?t want to spoil the various storylines for anyone who plans on watching the DVDs.

However, when I see Cesar?s ability to turn around a so-called ?bad dog? through his knowledge of ?dog behaviour, dog needs, and dog psychology?, I wonder whether we have simply missed the boat in our understanding of ?human behaviour, human needs, and human psychology?.

I mean all of these people with the ?bad dogs? and ?aggressive dogs? were all ?good people? ? ?loving people? ? people who treated their dogs with care and affection. For the most part they had no idea how or why their dogs turned out the way that they did.

How often do we hear the same thing during the trial of a murderer or rapist or pedophile? -- That they came from a ?good home?, a ?loving home?, a ?normal home? ? and no one understands how the person could have possibly turned out the way that they did.

I sit here and wonder whether we have missed out on some basic concepts in raising our children (and also the manner in which we behave toward one another) ? the same way that these ?loving? dog owners missed out on some basic concepts in raising their dogs. Could we unwittingly be causing the very behaviours that we later come to abhor?

Linda S.


Report this post
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2006 5:30 am 
Linda wrote:
What I am hoping is that I can learn something about human behaviour and human psychology from Cesar's vast knowledge of dog behaviour and dog psychology.
... ...
I was truly amazed at this man's ability to deal with complex (and sometimes violent) behavior patterns and often turn things around in a matter of minutes.

I find I can build trusting relationships with domesticated animals much more quickly than humans. Two humans who meet for the first time can behave nicely towards each other, but genuine trust takes longer with humans.

Recent fossil discoveries in China indicate that mammals evolved at least 200 million years before dinosaurs became extinct. What distinguishes a mammalian brain from a reptilian brain is the limbic system -- the emotional, feeling part of the brain. In his most recent book, Synaptic Self, neuroscientist Joseph LeDoux says:
Quote:
"[There is] an imperfect set of connections between cognitive and emotional systems in the current stage of evolution of the human brain. This state of affairs is part of the price we pay for having newly evolved cognitive capacities that are not yet fully integrated into our brains."

On an evolutionary timescale the cognitive faculties of the human neocortex are a recent blip. It's the feeling part of the brain, the limbic system, which has an evolutionary pedigree that dates back to the time when mammals first appeared. In most countries of the world the education system is heavily biased towards hothousing cognitive skills. In fact, a person doesn't need a high level of emotional intelligence to obtain a Ph.D. Cognitive skills alone are sufficient. The biologist Edward O. Wilson, who is probably best known for his book Sociobiology: The New Synthesis, wrote an article for the New York Times Magazine titled "Is Humanity Suicidal?" He said:
Quote:
"The human species is, in a word, an environmental abnormality. It is possible that intelligence in the wrong kind of species was foreordained to be a fatal combination for the biosphere."

So, basically, I wouldn't be optimistic that Cesar Millan's knowledge of dog psychology would be of much help in solving human psychological problems before there is a radical shift away from the cultural obsession with brain sciences and cognition.

* Mojo *


Report this post
Top
  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2006 8:28 pm 
I just remembered a similar post on the PPP a long time back. Someone pointed out that relative to body size and weight, the human limbic system is no bigger than that of a dog. I did a quick Google search at the time, but couldn't find any info on relative sizes between mammals. It wouldn't surprise me if there are other mammals who have a larger limbic system than humans, relative to body size.

* Mojo *


Report this post
Top
  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Aug 26, 2006 12:26 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Mar 28, 2006 10:52 am
Posts: 45
From The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams....
Quote:
"It is an important and popular fact that things are not always what they seem. For instance, on the planet Earth, man had always assumed that he was more intelligent than dolphins because he had achieved so much -- the wheel, New York, wars and so on -- whilst all the dolphins had ever done was muck about in the water having a good time. But conversely, the dolphins had always believed that they were far more intelligent than man -- for precisely the same reasons."

_________________
Bernard


Report this post
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Forum locked This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 4 posts ] 

All times are UTC + 1 hour [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group